How to build mutually beneficial Linkedin connections (Part 3)

mutuslly beneficial relationships

When I sat back and thought about what to write in this blog post it crossed my mind that cyber-relationships are very similar to face to face ones in that we go through a 3 stage process of actively seeking potential connections,  learning how to make ourselves attractive in their eyes so that they desire to connect with us and lastly putting in the work to maintain the relationship once we have connected with them.  So far in this short series on building mutually beneficial online connections via Linkedin and other social networking platforms, we have looked at the first two stages how to find mutually beneficial connections and how to attract them, last but not least this post aims to focus on how we can build and maintain these relationships once we connect with potential others. Continue reading

Advertisements

How to build mutually beneficial Linkedin connections (Part 2)

This post is the second in a series of posts looking into how we can create mutually beneficial Linkedin relationships, although the focus is on Linkedin, many of these principles can be applied to any social networking site.  To read the first post in the series concerning the importance of groups please click on this link How to build mutually beneficial Linkedin connections (Part 1).

The psychology of relationships

When we talk about relationships we need to be aware that people do not enter into relationships blindly, there is always a reason behind every interaction whether physical or virtual.  By understanding the psychology of relationships we become more aware of the whys and hows of forming relationships that work for all parties.  Think about these questions:

  1. what makes you decide to ‘connect’ with someone online?
  2. what makes you decide to accept a person’s request to connect?

By careful examination of what your thought processes when connecting online you will be much closer to understanding what other people expect from you when deciding to connect with you.

One of the topics I taught as a psychology teacher was the the psychology of relationships, there are several theories to explain why people form relationships both off and online. Continue reading

How to build mutually beneficial Linkedin connections (Part 1)

I have decided to write a series on how I feel we can get the most out of LinkedIn in relation to building mutually beneficial connections, the focus is on 3 key words: mutual, beneficial and connections.  Most of the time we focus on the last two words but forget the importance of the first, I sincerely believe that when we focus on building mutually beneficial connections amazing things can happen for all those concerned.

I have tried a number of online networking groups, I did Ecademy for a bit and even tried Ning, but neither of these were for me so it was a happy day when I finally stumbled upon LinkedInSo, what’s so great about LinkedIn?

  1. It’s totally business/profession minded – so it attracts serious people who want to connect with other serious people.
  2. you are able to create an online CV through your profile area – which is great for people finding you or the services you offer(try typing your name into Google and the chances are your LinkedIn profile will show up) but it gives you a chance to learn about potential contacts before deciding to connect.
  3. You have the opportunity to join groups based on your areas of interest and expertise which is beneficial not just for spotlighting how wonderful you are but also for learning and becoming more equipped.
  4. last but definitely not least it’s free to create a basic profile and every now and again LinkedIn give away free trials offers, so you can see whether their premium services are really as beneficial as they claim before signing on the dotted line.

So if you don’t have a LinkedIn account, just a take a short trip over to the site and register for free.

The importance of groups in building mutually beneficial connections Continue reading